Archive for January, 2022

Violence in Medicine: Necessary and Unnecessary, Intentional and Unintentional- An Ethics Course (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the concept of violence in medicine and healthcare.  Examples may include violence to the body (cancer treatments, dissection, surgery), structural violence (under-resourced patients), violence in language (illness is war, fight), or demeaning interactions (patient is non-compliant).  The course examines how the construct of medicine as savior affects the ethical principles of beneficence, autonomy, informed consent, decision-making, futility, and dignity.  Alternative metaphors for treatment are offered.

This course is recommended for medical social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

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Responding to Covid-19: New Trends in Social Workers Use of Information and Communication Technology (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the impact of ICT use on clinical practice during the Covid-19 pandemic and its affect on social work core values, including client well-being, confidentiality, privacy, boundaries, and advocacy.  The ICT expansion importantly allowed social workers to continue their therapeutic relationships with clients when it would not have been possible otherwise.  Many clients responded well to the increased flexibility and creativity offered by ICT.  Other clients experienced critical barriers, such as lack of internet access and poor internet literacy.  Ethical dilemmas were experienced and examples are given.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

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Political Advocacy Without a Choice: Highlighting African American Political Social Workers (2 credit hours)

Participants who complete this course will receive 2 continuing education clock hours. 1 of these clock hours is Ethics and 1 of these clock hours is Social and Cultural Competence.

Program Summary:   This course highlights the political action and leadership of early African American social workers and their work challenging discrimination and injustice while advocating for systemic change.  Authors Donisha Shepherd and Suzanne Pritzer offer a social work history that moves beyond Jane Addams’ Hull House and includes the important and sometimes overlooked contributions of social workers like Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Victoria Earle Matthews, Thyra Edwards, Lester Blackwell Granger, and more.  The course uses Lane and Pritzker’s five domains of political social work practice as a framework for understanding the different domains of political advocacy.  The course also includes the NASW 2021 Blueprint of Federal and Social Policy Priorities, which outlines current policy priorities and solutions for national leaders.  Priorities such as high quality healthcare for all, ending homelessness, eliminating racism, reforming immigration policy, and advancing political justice are given.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

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Guardianship and Advocacy: Exploring the Ethical Principles of Autonomy, Self-Determination, Decision-Making, Well-Being, and Non-Malfeasance (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:   This course explores the legal process of guardianship and the ethical principles of advocacy, autonomy, self-determination, decision-making, and non-malfeasance.  While guardianship serves an important role in protecting individuals from harm, it also limits fundamental rights as decision-making is transferred from the individual to the guardian.  For this reason, the appointment of a guardian should always be a last resort and only if a less restrictive option is not achievable.  The course highlights the role of the guardian as advocate, promoting the individual’s rights, wishes, and well-being.  The course also examines how the Covid-19 pandemic resulted in changes to practice, some of which will likely continue as we move forward in a post-pandemic world. NGA Guardianship Standards of Practice and Ethical Principles are featured.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

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An Ethical Analysis of the Mitigation Measures, Restrictions, and Social Isolation of Long Term Care Residents during the Covid-19 Pandemic (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course offers an ethical analysis of the mitigation measures, restrictions, and social isolation of long term care residents during the Covid-19 pandemic.  The course explores concepts of harm, proportionality, reciprocity, and transparency.  Ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, maleficence, and justice are examined.  The reading also includes surveys of long term care family members measuring the impact of restrictions on their relatives’ physical and mental conditions.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

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Pandemic Ethics: Rethinking Rights, Responsibilities and Roles in Social Work (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the ethical challenges experienced by UK social workers during the Covid-19 pandemic and offers a framework for understanding ethics during a time of crisis.  Four broad responses to ethical challenges were identified and include ethical confusion, ethical distress, ethical creativity, and ethical learning.   The course highlights social workers’ efforts to practice ethically during this time of change and introduces concepts of ethical agency, slow ethics, and professional judgement.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

Read the complete description of this course…..


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