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Anti-Racism, Anti-Discrimination Continuing Education Courses

At Free State Social Work, we provide great online anti-racism, anti-discrimination continuing education courses for social workers, counselors, and therapists!

All of our courses are $5.99 per credit hour. We also offer an unlimited package! One year of unlimited courses is $74.99 and two years are $124.99.

Click here for more details about our unlimited packages.

Click here for more information about how to get started.


Child Welfare and Social Work Education: From a Pedagogy of Oppression to a Pedagogy of Resistance (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This thought-provoking course explores the relationship between social work and the child welfare system and critiques the federal Title IV-E training program and the ethical conflicts involved in training MSW students to regulate families.  The course examines the forces of racism, classism, misogyny, and injustice within the child welfare system.  The course suggests that the relationship between child welfare and social work must be reimagined and recreated in a new way that will allow social workers to meet the needs of children and families while also upholding the ethical principle of social justice.

Social justice is a core value of the social work profession, and the NASW Code of Ethics establishes the ethical principle to challenge social injustice.

Value: Social Justice
Ethical Principle:
Social workers challenge social injustice.  Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people.  Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice.  These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity.  Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.  
NASW Code of Ethics

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate, levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.
Read the complete description of this course…..


Understanding Privilege and Engaging in Activism: Elevating Social Justice in Social Work (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course examines the social work profession’s commitment to social justice with a research study of 310 MSW students, exploring which individual factors were most associated with activism and engagement.  The concept of intersectionality is highlighted and provides a framework for understanding how individuals hold multiple, overlapping identities that result in various combinations of discrimination, oppression, and privilege.  The course finds that an increased understanding of privilege, power, and the intersecting systems of oppression is required in our efforts to elevate social justice. Social justice is a core value of the social work profession, and the NASW Code of Ethics establishes the ethical principle to challenge social injustice.

Value: Social Justice
Ethical Principle:
Social workers challenge social injustice.  Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people.  Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice.  These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity.  Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.  
NASW Code of Ethics

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate, levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.
Read the complete description of this course…..


Intersections of Institutional Racism, Racial Microaggressions, and Minority Stress in the Lived Experiences of Black People (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores experiences of institutional racism, structural uncertainties, and racial microaggressions among people who are Black.  The course examines the concept of minority stress and demonstrates that people who are Black disproportionately experience both macro- and micro-level racial stressors which contribute to minority stress.   Using secondary data analysis, the course shows a positive correlation between racial stressors and minority stress among people who are Black and advocates for micro- and macro-level changes.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice. Read the complete description of this course…..


Negative Patient Descriptors: Documenting Racial Bias In The Electronic Health Record (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:   This course explores potential implicit bias in healthcare by looking at stigmatizing language in the healthcare record. The course highlights a study using machine learning to analyze electronic health records using 15 different patient descriptors:  (non-) adherent, aggressive, agitated, angry, challenging, combative, (non-)compliant, confront, (non-) cooperative, defensive, exaggerate, hysterical, (un-)pleasant, refuse, and resist.  A discussion of results and recommendations are given.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists.

Read the complete description of this course…..


Institutional Change and Transgender Employment- Cultural and Ethical Issues (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:   This course discusses transgender employment discrimination, related ethical implications, and why advocacy is needed.  Important legal cases are examined, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Bostock v. Clayton County.  The course highlights ethical standards from the NASW Code of Ethics, including engaging in social and political action (macro level); practicing non-discriminatory practices (mezzo level); and promoting the well-being of clients (micro level).   The course provides an overview of what it means to be transgender with guidance on how to be a good ally.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate, levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC ethics credit.

Unfortunately, this course is no longer available in CE Broker for Florida professionals.

Participants who complete this course will receive 2 continuing education clock hours. 1 of these clock hours is Ethics and 1 of these clock hours is Social and Cultural Competence.

Read the complete description of this course…..


Embracing Diverse Women Veteran Narratives: Intersectionality and Women Veteran’s Identity (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course applies the theory of intersectionality to women veterans and explores how women veterans often experience multiple forms of oppression such as racism, sexism, and classism.  The course examines how these experiences of oppression accumulate and affect identity formation.   Intersectionality is offered as an meaningful way to increase our understanding of women veterans’ lives and experiences.  Important concepts are discussed including markers of difference, institutional betrayal, horizontal hostility, and individual solutions.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.

Read the complete description of this course…..


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