Examination of Stigmatizing Language in the Electronic Health Record (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:   This course examines stigmatizing language in the electronic health record and how stigmatizing words and phrases may impact health equity.   The course explores three forms of stigmatizing language: labeling someone as other, blaming, and invoking danger.  Patients with diabetes, substance use disorder, and chronic pain are explored as subgroups.  Findings and study limitations are presented.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists.

“Book  Open the Course Reading Here.

Course Reading:  Examination of Stigmatizing Language in the Electronic Health Record

Authors:  Gracie Himmelstein, MD; David Bates, MD, MS; Li Zhou, MD, PhD

Publisher:  JAMA Network Open

Additional Reading:  Preferred Terms for Select Population Groups and Communities/ CDC

Course Objectives:  To enhance professional practice, values, skills and knowledge by examining stigmitizing language in the electronic healthcare record.

Learning Objectives:  Identify the three general forms of stigmatizing language.  Describe how stigmatizing language varies according to patient and provider characteristics.  Describe how stigmatizing language in medical notes impacts health equity.

Review our pre-reading study guide.

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1: Introduction// Labeling patients as substance abusers is an example of
 
 
 
2: Calling distressed patients belligerent or combative is an example of
 
 
 
3: In vignette studies, clinicians were less likely to recommend treatment for patients
 
 
4: Clinicians reading vignettes about patients with sickle cell disease chose ___________ aggressive pain management regimens when vignettes included stigmatizing language.
 
 
5: Data and Processing// According to Table 1, the term 'nonadherence' appeared 299 times in the admission note for patients with
 
 
 
6: Discussion///  Stigmatizing language about diabetes, substance use disorder, or chronic pain appeared in 1 of 40 hospital admission notes and particularly frequently in the notes of patients with
 
 
 
7: Across all conditions studied, notes about _______________ more often included stigmatizing language.
 
 
8: Notes written by more experienced physicians with a higher PGY included ____________ stigmatizing language than those written by less experienced physicians.
 
 
9: One study found that approximately __________ of patients who read their EHR felt judged or offended by their physician's language.
 
 
 
 
10: Limitations// Which of the following is a limitation of the study?
 
 
 
 

In order to purchase or take this course, you will need to log in. If you do not have an account, you will need to register for a free account.

After you log in, a link will appear here that will allow you to purchase this course.

 

Free State Social Work, LLC, provider #1235, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. Free State Social Work, LLC maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 9/6/2021 - 9/6/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 1 continuing education credit.

Free State Social Work has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP NO. 6605. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Free State Social Work is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

G.M. Rydberg-Cox, MSW, LSCSW is the Continuing Education Director at Free State Social Work and responsible for the development of this course.  She received her Masters of Social Work in 1996 from the Jane Addams School of Social Work at the University of Illinois-Chicago and she has over 20 years of experience.  She has lived and worked as a social worker in Chicago, Boston, and Kansas City.  She currently practices in the area of hospital/medical social work.  The reading materials for this course were developed by another organization.