The Importance of a Trauma-Informed Child Welfare System (1 credit hour)

Course Summary:  Building a trauma-informed practice requires ongoing training and support with a shift in the conversation from asking “What’s wrong with you?” to “What happened to you?”  This course explores how trauma-informed child welfare improves children’s safety, permanency, and well-being.  The course examines trauma screening and assessment, workforce development, resource parent training, access to evidence- based treatment, and the role of protective factors.

This course is recommended for social workers and counselors and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.

Find the reading at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/trauma_informed.pdf

Publisher:  Children’s Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway

Course Objectives:  To enhance professional practice, values, skills and knowledge by examining a trauma-informed child welfare system.

Learning Objectives:  Give examples of acute trauma, complex trauma, historical trauma, and secondary traumatic stress.  Describe trauma-informed practice.  Identify the role of protective factors for building resilience and healing.

Review our pre-reading study guide.

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1: A car accident would be an example of
 
 
 
2: Repeated abuse and neglect would be an example of
 
 
 
3: Child welfare systems that are trauma informed are better able to address children's
 
 
 
 
4: Initial screening should be as __________ as possible.
 
 
5: A trauma-informed system asks
 
 
6: With trauma-informed care, the focus of child welfare services is broadened to include
 
 
 
 
7: Hearing about children's and families' trauma histories may result in _____________ among professionals and caregivers.
 
 
 
 
8: Left untreated, STS can lead to
 
 
 
 
9: Education and support for resource parents
 
 
10: The Family First Prevention Services Act of 2018 is moving child welfare toward trauma-informed care by requiring that all ____________ funded prevention services be trauma informed.
 
 
 
 
11: Which of the following is an example of a protective factor?
 
 
 
 

In order to purchase or take this course, you will need to log in. If you do not have an account, you will need to register for a free account.

After you log in, a link will appear here that will allow you to purchase this course.

 

Free State Social Work, LLC, provider #1235, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. Free State Social Work, LLC maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 9/6/2021 - 9/6/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 1 continuing education credit.

Free State Social Work has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP NO. 6605. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Free State Social Work is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

G.M. Rydberg-Cox, MSW, LSCSW is the Continuing Education Director at Free State Social Work and responsible for the development of this course.  She received her Masters of Social Work in 1996 from the Jane Addams School of Social Work at the University of Illinois-Chicago and she has over 20 years of experience.  She has lived and worked as a social worker in Chicago, Boston, and Kansas City.  She currently practices in the area of hospital/medical social work.  The reading materials for this course were developed by another organization.