Archive for August, 2021

Unintended Consequences: Intimate Partner Violence, Military Caregivers, and the Law (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:  This course explores the unique challenges facing military caregivers who experience intimate partner violence. Caregivers’ dependence on military members’ entitlements add additional complexities.  Risk factors for IPV perpetration are discussed, including injuries such as PTSD, SUD, and TBI.  Finally, the course discusses how state elder and disability abuse statutes add barriers for military caregivers who are considering leaving the relationship.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.

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American Veterans and the Evolution of Mental Health: A Historical Review of Diagnoses and Depiction (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the evolution of mental health for veterans using a historical perspective.  Throughout the 20th and 21st century, the ‘invisible wounds of war” have progressed from war neurosis and “soldier’s heart” to shell shock and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.   Vietnam War veterans were essential in establishing the diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and recognizing PTSD as a treatable, medical condition affecting both civilian and military populations.  The course examines archetypal military stereotypes, the continuity of stigma, and oversimplified depictions and images of US veterans.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.

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Embracing Diverse Women Veteran Narratives: Intersectionality and Women Veteran’s Identity (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course applies the theory of intersectionality to women veterans and explores how women veterans often experience multiple forms of oppression such as racism, sexism, and classism.  The course examines how these experiences of oppression accumulate and affect identity formation.   Intersectionality is offered as an meaningful way to increase our understanding of women veterans’ lives and experiences.  Important concepts are discussed including markers of difference, institutional betrayal, horizontal hostility, and individual solutions.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.

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