Tribal-State Relations and Child Welfare (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores how positive working relationships can be formed between States and Tribes in the provision of child welfare services.   The course examines important historical and cultural factors and includes suggestions for current practice.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors and therapists and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  

Course Reading:  Tribal-State Relations

Publisher:  Child Welfare Information Gateway; Children’s Bureau

Find the reading at:  https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/tribal_state.pdf

Course Objectives:  To enhance professional practice, values, skills, and knowledge by identifying key issues related to Tribal -State Relations and Child Welfare.

Learning Objectives:   Describe the concept of historical trauma.  Identify at least two important values of Tribal communities.  Describe culturally appropriate permanency alternatives, such as Tribal customary adoption.

Review our pre-reading study guide.

Additional reading:  Culture Card:  A Guide to Build Cultural Awareness-  American Indian and Alaska Native- http://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content//SMA08-4354/SMA08-4354.pdf

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1: Through the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, Congress stated that there is 'no resource that is more vital to the continued existence and integrity of Indian tribes than their _____________' (25 U.S.C. Sec. 1901).
 
 
 
 
2: What legislation allows Tribes to apply for child welfare funding directly from the Federal Government through title IV-E of the Social Security Act?
 
 
 
 
3: Historical trauma is best described as
 
 
 
 
4: Which of the following best describes Sovereign Nation?
 
 
 
5: Which of the following are important values within Tribal communities?
 
 
 
 
6: It is best for tribes and States to communicate
 
 
7: When addressing jurisdictional issues, Tribal/State communications should emphasize
 
 
8: California's Indian Child and Family Services (ICFS) focuses on prevention as a way
 
 
9: The Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) emphasizes the American Indian value of respecting and honoring
 
 
 
 
10: The NACJP brought together more than 500 Native Americans and California court representatives to hear the voices of
 
 
 
 
11: In 2010, California enacted a law that allows Tribal customary adoptions to be completed in a State court.  Which of the following is not a provision of this new law?
 
 
 
 

In order to purchase or take this course, you will need to log in. If you do not have an account, you will need to register for a free account.

After you log in, a link will appear here that will allow you to purchase this course.

 

Free State Social Work, LLC, provider #1235, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. Free State Social Work, LLC maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 9/6/2021 - 9/6/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 1 continuing education credit.

Free State Social Work has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP NO. 6605. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Free State Social Work is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.