Clinical Social Workers: Advocates for Social Justice (1 Credit Hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the relationship between clinical social work, advocacy, and social justice, and recognizes advocacy as a strategy for achieving social justice.  The reading looks at a qualitative research study which examines how social workers incorporate social justice and advocacy efforts in their practice.  Three strategies for advocacy are identified:  instrumental advocacy, educational advocacy, and practical advocacy.

Value: Social Justice

Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.

Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.  (NASW Code of Ethics)

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course does not meet CE requirements for National Certified Counselors.

Author:  Anne Marie McLaughlin

Publisher:  Advances in Social Work

Find the article at:  http://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/advancesinsocialwork/article/view/209/212

Program Objectives:  To enhance social work practice, values, skills, and knowledge by identifying key issues related to clinical social work, social justice, and advocacy.

Learning Objectives:  Give examples of the various ways social workers identify advocacy efforts in their work.  Give examples of instrumental advocacy, educational advocacy, and practical advocacy.  Identify potential challenges of integrating advocacy into social work practice.

Review our pre-reading study guide.

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1: Advocacy is a well-established strategy for achieving social justice.
 
 
2: Attention to advocacy is most often presented in
 
 
 
3: Historically, advocacy has been divided into
 
 
4: Although advocacy appears to be a central role for social workers, many authors are extremely cautious and somewhat ambivalent in supporting its implementation.  For instance, Forbat and Atkinson (2005)
 
 
 
5: In her study, Nelson (1999) found that front line workers ranked advocacy ____________ out of five commonly performed functions.
 
 
 
 
6: The course reading reports on a ______________ study which sampled 18 social workers from a western province in Canada.
 
 
7: The goal of the qualitative research study is to
 
 
8: The study identifies 3 types of advocacy that are embedded in the data including all of the following except:
 
 
 
 
9: Which type of advocacy involves working with clients directly to access resources?
 
 
 
10: According to Table 1 on p. 57, practical advocacy involves all of the following except:
 
 
 
 
11: Engaging with other systems to secure rights and resources would be an example of
 
 
 
12: Educating others about issues that oppress or stigmatize is an example of
 
 
 
13: Assisting a client with an application for funding would be an example of
 
 
 
14: Which of the following are possible barriers to advocacy as a strategy for social justice?
 
 
 
 
15: This study extends the discussion of advocacy beyond the
 
 
16: Social workers who feel empowered are better equipped to advocate with and on behalf of clients.
 
 

In order to purchase or take this course, you will need to log in. If you do not have an account, you will need to register for a free account.

After you log in, a link will appear here that will allow you to purchase this course.

 

Free State Social Work, LLC, provider #1235, is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved as ACE providers. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. Free State Social Work, LLC maintains responsibility for this course. ACE provider approval period: 9/6/2021 - 9/6/2024. Social workers completing this course receive 1 continuing education credit.

Free State Social Work has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP NO. 6605. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Free State Social Work is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.