The Evolution of Social Work Ethics (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course describes the evolution of social work ethics, beginning with the early moralistic perspectives of the late nineteenth century and ending with today’s unique ethical challenges of the digital age.  The course includes 5 key stages of social work ethics:  the morality period, the values period, the ethical theory and decision-making period, the ethical standards and risk management period, and the digital period.   A discussion of the NASW Code of Ethics is included as well.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors.

Course Reading:  The Evolution of Social Work Ethics:  Bearing Witness by Frederic G. Reamer, Ph.D.

Publisher:  Advances in Social Work (Spring 2014)

Find the reading at:  https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/advancesinsocialwork/article/viewFile/14637/16940

Course Objectives:  To enhance professional practice, values, skills, and knowledge by identifying key issues related to the evolution of social work ethics.

Learning Objectives:  Contrast core values and ethical dilemmas.  Identify the five key stages of the evolution of social work ethics.  Describe the ethical shifts of the 1960’s, 1970’s, 1980’s, 1990’s, and 2000’s.

Review our pre-reading study guide.

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1: As a graduate student at the University of Chicago in the 1970's, the author realizes that social work entails complex ethical dilemmas which he describes as
 
 
2: In his work, the author explores connections between
 
 
 
 
3: In the author's view, the evolution of social work values and ethics has occurred in five key stages, including all of the following except:
 
 
 
 
 
 
4: The morality period was mostly concerned about the morality of
 
 
 
5: Which of the following best characterizes the Values Period?
 
 
 
 
6: In the 1960's, social workers shifted considerable attention toward the ethical constructs of
 
 
 
 
7: The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) adopted its first code of ethics in
 
 
 
 
8: Which of the following is an example of applied and professional ethics (practical ethics)?
 
 
 
 
9: The emergence of a corpus of literature on social work ethics occurred in the
 
 
 
 
10: Complex connections between ethical standards in social work and risk management emerged in the
 
 
 
 
11: In 1993, the NASW Delegate Assembly voted to amend the code to include
 
 
 
12: The 1996 NASW Code of Ethics (revised in 2008)
 
 
 
13: Complex issues related to social workers' use of digital and other 'distance' or remote technology emerged in the
 
 
 
 
14: Social workers' use of digital and other electronic technology raises particularly challenging issues related to
 
 
 
 

In order to purchase or take this course, you will need to log in. If you do not have an account, you will need to register for a free account.

After you log in, a link will appear here that will allow you to purchase this course.

 

Free State Social Work, LLC, provider #1235, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org, through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Free State Social Work, LLC maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 9/6/2018 - 9/6/2021. Social Workers should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval. Social Workers participating in this course will receive 1 continuing education clock hour.

Free State Social Work has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP NO. 6605. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Free State Social Work is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.