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Continuing Education courses about Ethics

Landmark Ethics Cases- The Case of Karen Quinlan (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course looks at the landmark case of Karen Ann Quinlan, one of the first ‘right to die’ cases in US legal history.  The case examines the dilemma of Karen Quinlan’s right to privacy versus the State’s interest in preserving life.  The course explores topics of privacy, the definition of death, the rights of the incompetent, liability, the ethics committee, judicious neglect and parens patria.  The case was ultimately appealed to the Supreme Court of New Jersey where Judge Hughes appointed Karen’s father as her guardian and authorized the removal of the respirator.

“The State’s interest to maintain life weaken, and a patient’s right of privacy grows, as the degree of bodily invasion increases and as prognosis dims.  Ultimately there comes a point at which the individual’s rights overcome the State’s interest.” (Judge Hughes of the New Jersey Supreme Court, 1976)

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning,  intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC credit.

Read the complete description of this course…..


Promoting Socially Just Healthcare Systems: Social Work’s Contribution to Patient Navigation (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course examines patient navigation, a new practice in healthcare designed to help patients navigate complex healthcare systems and overcome treatment barriers.  The course promotes patient navigation as a way for social workers to pursue their professional mandate for social justice while also contending that social workers are uniquely qualified to serve as patient navigators due to their professional commitment to social justice and dignity and worth of all persons.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning,  intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC credit.

Read the complete description of this course…..


Ethical Considerations in End of Life Care (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:  This course examines ethical considerations in end of life care and includes historical perspectives on death and dying, US cultural attitudes, an overview of grief models, professional obligations, and ethical principles.  The course explores key positions offered by the American Medical Association, the American Nurses Association, and the NASW.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning,  intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC credit.
Read the complete description of this course…..


Ending Conversion Therapy: Supporting and Affirming LGBTQ Youth (4 credit hours)

Participants who complete this course will receive 4 continuing education clock hours. 2 of these clock hours are Ethics and 2 of these clock hours are Social and Cultural Competence

Program Summary:  This course explores issues of sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in youth.  The course provides a scientific overview of the best clinical and therapeutic practices for sexual minority youth and promotes interventions that focus on acceptance, support, and affirmative care.   The course includes position statements from the ACA and the NASW and offers a discussion of relevant ethical principles and standards.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors and therapists and is appropriate for beginning,  intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.   Read the complete description of this course…..


The Role of the Social Work Profession in Meeting its Historical Mission to Serve Vulnerable Populations (1 Credit Hour)

Program Summary:  The course includes first hand accounts from social work practitioners who examine how the field of social work has historically delivered services to the poor and oppressed.  The course examines the profession’s historical affinity for social casework over social justice and describes various casework approaches which primarily served the middle class and not the poor. The course describes how the profession was reminded of its founding mission and concern for the disempowered during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960’s.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC credit. Read the complete description of this course…..


Applying Ethical Standards to Social Media Use with Vulnerable Populations (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:  This course explores the convergence of ethics, technology, and social work practice.  It examines important benefits and risks of utilizing current technology in social work practice and explores the ethical concepts of informed consent, confidentiality, disclosure and verification of identity.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for NBCC credit.

Read the complete description of this course…..


The ACA Code of Ethics (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:  This course reviews The American Counseling Association’s Code of Ethics.  The ACA Code of Ethics presents ethical obligations, considerations, and responsibilities of ACA members.  It is a guide and resource for ethical practice in counseling.

This course is recommended for counselors and therapists and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course is not recommended for social workers. Read the complete description of this course…..


Ethics Do Matter, But Where? (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course examines how social work values and principles relate to workplace practices.  The course examines ethical incongruence in the workplace, including bullying and discourteous conduct toward colleagues.  The course encourages discussion and reflection about our professional conduct and our everyday interactions with colleagues.

This course is recommended for social workers* and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors.

*Although the course is written from a social work point of view, the course and discussion would be relevant to many helping professions who share similar values.

Read the complete description of this course…..


Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course examines the importance of technology for social work practice and the implication for social work ethics.  Using the NASW Code of Ethics, the course examines the impact of information and communication technologies on specific principles of social work ethics.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors.   Read the complete description of this course…..


End-of-Life Issues in the US after Terri Schiavo: Implications for Social Work Practice (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course examines the Terri Schiavo case and the complexity of end-of-life decision-making and euthanasia.  The course offers an analysis of changing American perceptions of physician-assisted suicide and includes four approaches to policy practice.  Ethical issues of end-of-life, self-determination, advocacy, and patient rights are explored.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors. Read the complete description of this course…..


The Evolution of Social Work Ethics (1 credit hour)

Program Summary:  This course describes the evolution of social work ethics, beginning with the early moralistic perspectives of the late nineteenth century and ending with today’s unique ethical challenges of the digital age.  The course includes 5 key stages of social work ethics:  the morality period, the values period, the ethical theory and decision-making period, the ethical standards and risk management period, and the digital period.   A discussion of the NASW Code of Ethics is included as well.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors. Read the complete description of this course…..


Summary of the HIPAA Privacy Rule (2 credit hours)

Program Summary:  This course examines the HIPAA Privacy Rule and offers a summary of its key provisions.  The Rule establishes national standards for the protection of individual health information.

This course is recommended for social workers, counselors, and therapists and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice. This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors.

Read the complete description of this course…..


National Board for Certified Counselors (NBCC) Code of Ethics (1 Credit Hour)

Program Summary:  The NBCC Code of Ethics establishes minimum ethical behaviors for National Certified Counselors.  It is a guide and resource for ethical practice in counseling.

This course is recommended for National Certified Counselors and is appropriate for all levels of practice. Read the complete description of this course…..


Clinical Social Workers: Advocates for Social Justice (1 Credit Hour)

Program Summary:  This course explores the relationship between clinical social work, advocacy, and social justice, and recognizes advocacy as a strategy for achieving social justice.  The reading looks at a qualitative research study which examines how social workers incorporate social justice and advocacy efforts in their practice.  Three strategies for advocacy are identified:  instrumental advocacy, educational advocacy, and practical advocacy.

Value: Social Justice

Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.

Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.  (NASW Code of Ethics)

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course does not meet CE requirements for National Certified Counselors. Read the complete description of this course…..


Spirituality and Older Adults: Ethical Guidelines to Enhance Service Provision (1 Credit Hour)

Program Summary: This paper identifies spirituality as a client strength but also cautions that many social workers have limited training with respect to client spirituality.  The authors propose three ethical principles to guide social work practice with older adults and spirituality:  client autonomy, spiritual competence, and professional competence.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors. Read the complete description of this course…..


When Battered Women Stay… Advocacy Beyond Leaving (2 Credit Hours)

Program Summary: This course explores the complex work of preserving a battered woman’s right to make decisions about her life and her family.  The article explores assumptions within the domestic violence field that leaving abusive relationships is the best approach to ending domestic violence.  The author broadens the discussion by proposing an expanded advocacy for survivors who choose to stay.

NASW ethical standard 1.02:  Self Determination:  “Social workers respect and promote the right of clients to self­ determination and assist clients in their efforts to identify and clarify their goals. Social workers may limit clients’ right to self­ determination when, in the social workers’ professional judgment, clients’ actions or potential actions pose a serious, foreseeable, and imminent risk to themselves or others.”

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning and intermediate levels of practice.  This course does not meet the ethics requirement for National Certified Counselors.

Read the complete description of this course…..


NASW Code of Ethics (1 Credit Hour)

Program summary: The NASW Code of Ethics sets forth basic values, ethical principles, and ethical standards to be used as a guide for social workers’ conduct and practice.

This course is recommended for social workers and is appropriate for beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of practice.  This course does not meet continuing education requirements for National Certified Counselors.

Read the complete description of this course…..


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